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Personal Finance FAQ

What’s the One Money Question You Wish Someone Would Answer for You?

Question mark in Esbjerg
Ask and ye shall receive

I’ve written almost 300 articles about money, Monkey Brain, personal finance, small business, entrepreneurship, and life in general. However, if you’re here, you either think I’m really funny, or there’s still some piece of information that you’re looking for.

I know that I could continue to write articles until the end of my ability to piece coherent thoughts together and still not cover all of the potential personal finance and behavioral questions out there. So, I want to turn the floor over to you.

What’s that one burning money question you wish that someone would answer for you?

Leave it in the comments below, or if you would rather remain anonymous, you can contact me instead. Have at it!

By

Jason Hull, CFP®, was the co-founder of Broadtree Partners, a firm that acquires $1-5MM EBITDA companies. He also was the co-founder of open source search consultancy OpenSource Connections, a premier Solr and ElasticSearch firm. He and his wife FIREd (financial independence retire early) at 46 and 45, respectively. He has a BS from the United States Military Academy at West Point and a MBA from the University of Virginia Darden Graduate School of Business.

You can read more about him in the About Page.

9 replies on “What’s the One Money Question You Wish Someone Would Answer for You?”

Withdrawal strategies for retirement. Once you’ve mastered the Monkey-Mind, and saved up all that money in retirement accounts, how to shift gears and create the spend-down plan? Not advice for multi-millionaires, but for ordinary middle class folks.

How to save money on groceries? Ok, I’ll let myself out…

Seriously though, how do you manage to change people’s mindset. My sister is doing terrible (low wage, divorce, single mum) and I have a few other people around me who seem to come to me for advice but are not really motivated and for as much as I try to help they don’t want to change deep down. One went gambling “because I thought it would make things better”. So what does one have to see to want to get back on track with one’s finances?

We have recently just started investing in stocks. We have 14 Canadian stocks through DRiP’s and Discount Brokerage Accounts. What are the processes and implications of owning US stocks? (How to, tax implications, within DRiP’s, within Brokerage Accounts, etc.)

Hi Mark – Are you in the U.S. or Canada? I suspect, given the nature of the question, that you’re in Canada. I’m in the U.S., so I’m not qualified to answer Canadian questions, which, if I understand correctly, boils down to “As a Canadian, how do I invest in U.S. stocks and what are the implications?” I suggest you check out Sandi Martin of Spring Personal Finance. She’s the Canadian version of me.

If I’m wrong, let me know!

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